books

All posts tagged books

Sphere - (1987 book), by Michael Crichton cover

Entertainment > Reading >

(on Wikipedia)

The United States Navy discovers a crashed craft, and includes a cross-disciplinary team in its investigation.

I liked it, though I found it rather simple. I had already seen the movie that was inspired by this book, which I really liked, and that likely coloured my views.



Continue Reading

Timeline - (1999 book) cover

Entertainment > Reading >

(on Wikipedia)

Archaeologists discover the site they're working on is surrounded by land owned by their funder, a rich technology company, which is even more interested in it than they.

A riveting book that escalates into a great pace by its middle, and had me turning pages until I finished that latter half in one afternoon. The end chapter is an embarrassingly-bad wrap-up though, which was saddening, but it did not ruin the story.

Highly-recommended. This book has turned me back into a reader.



Continue Reading

Much Ado About Nothing - (1623 play), by Shakespeare - Signet Classic image

Entertainment > Reading >

(on Wikipedia)

An man works to undermine his brother's happiness by meddling with his son's marriage. Also two smart people dual with words.

A pretty good book, though my reading of the Signet Classic was seriously interrupted by footnotes. Not because of the shifting up/down to read them, but because the footnotes are crammed all together. Given that this book is 1/4 commentary, axing one for clearer footnotes would have been amazing. Maybe another edition will be better. I intend to collect many of this particular play.



Continue Reading

My cover is different
My cover is different

Entertainment > Reading >

(on Wikipedia)

A spoiled little girl loses her rich parents and is sent away to live with her reclusive heartbroken (rich) relative.

The story is fairly awful to me, though I can see how this was popular at the time. It has definitely aged, not just in its period but in its language and writing style.

I'll class this as "liked", but I only see this as being good for historical reasons and wouldn't recommend it. I'll also class this as child-friendly, except it's child-friendly in its context: A parent reading to their child in the early 1900s.

Continue Reading

Being read

This doesn't even begin to do this book justice
This doesn't even begin to do this book justice

Entertainment > Reading >

(on Wikipedia)

An extraordinary tactician and samurai (Japanese swordsman) had a late-life crisis and retired into monkhood. Over time, he allowed a scribe to record advice from his experience. Though meant to be extremely-selectively passed-on, it ultimately found itself in the hands of enough people to survive to today. It is a book on the martial use of the sword, the way of swords, the way of personal and mass martial strategy, and the Way.

I haven't read broadly and deeply enough, and I doubt anyone has, to truly judge this work in the context of what humanity has to offer (what has survived, that is), but I feel comfortable saying this is one of the Great works. I should say I highly recommend it, but I fear most people wouldn't even begin to comprehend it even in any vague sense. This is not a beginner's book, whatever "beginner" means with this book in that context. At the very least, this ought to be read by people who are deeply passionate about philosophy (of the armchair variety).

My edition of this book has an unfortunately-shiny fabric hardcover, with glossy full-colour pages with photographs which give it an impression of high quality. It even has an integrated ribbon bookmark. When reading it at length, I get the impression that the pages will eventually pull out. I hope this is not true.



Continue Reading

the-prince-1910-by-niccolo-machiavelli-cover

Entertainment > Reading >

(on Wikipedia)

A tactically-minded man creates an instruction manual for action and understanding in the realm of high-lords of kingdoms.

At under 70 pages, this book may be thin but it's incredibly dense. I found myself reading paragraphs three times before moving on. Although nothing in it surprised me, I can still easily recommend it. It's been, somehow, given a bad name. I only found a slight tinge of "evil" creeping in at about the half-way mark, but nothing inexcusable.

I understood it well enough to add strong commentary, and to give much improved explanation in the latter half which draws from the former. It's interesting to me that the author himself didn't catch on to the trends in his own advice.

Like The Art of War - (~476 BC book), by Sunzi, people have interpreted this text for all manner of uses such as the business world.



Continue Reading

bushido-1924-01-03-book-minoru-tanaka-cover

Entertainment > Reading >

(on Wikipedia)

A book on Bushido, the old way of the samurai, as created in conversation with an old master-turned-monk.

In a time when the others were softening up, a samurai who had lost his master and left to live in a monastery spoke in hushed tones to a friend about the old ways he grew up in. Although he and others insisted the manuscripts be burned, the promises were broken when they were kept secret. They would be later compiled and published, and even later translated from its original Japanese.

A particularly interesting book. Although most of it is definitely not directly-applicable today, I think anyone who already has a sufficient "wisdom" (whatever that means) will find bits and pieces of insight.



Continue Reading

Entertainment > Reading >

(on Wikipedia)

Collections of science fiction short stories, curated by.. people I don't know and who have no authority in my mind. They came into being pre-internet and still cling to relevancy.

I was excited to find these, but their stories are hit-and-miss.

Continue Reading

TODO - re-read and especially the other essays.

Not the cover of my edition.
Not the cover of my edition.

Entertainment > Reading >

I'm either stupid or arrogant to say that this isn't particularly good. I'll have to re-read it yet again before I can either give a description or a proper opinion.

  1. 1942 - The Myth of Sisyphus

    • First translated into English in 1955.
  2. (other essays noted below) TODO

nightwork-2003-book-by-t-f-peterson-cover

Entertainment > Reading >

(on Wikipedia)
hacks.mit.edu

A book on a particular aspect of culture and events in the history of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

It glimpses into one aspect of "playful hacking", pranks and practical jokes.

  • Properly titled Nightwork - A history of hacks and pranks at MIT
  • ISBN 9 780262 661379
  • "Institute Historian T. F. Peterson" is likely a play on the MIT cultural acronym "IHTFP".